The Warmth of Happy

Anything that strikes my fancy

To cookie or not to cookie

To cookie or not to cookie? Whether it is tastier to suffer the chub and sugar of tremendous cookies or to take whisk against a bowl of eggs, and by stirring beat them. To eat, to munch, no more and by a nibble to say we end the stomachache and the thousand natural cravings the sweet tooth is heir to. it’s a batch most tempting to be eaten. To eat, to munch, to munch, perchance to bite, ay, there’s the vanilla. For in that munch of delight what tastes may come when we have iced through this natural cake, must give us piece. There’s the recipe that makes cake of so long baking. For who would bake the whips and scoops of time, the chef’s wraith, the customer’s shouts, the pangs of dread, the icing’s delay, the soufflés falling, and the burns that make it worth it when you yourself make with a bare box of Betty Crocker? Who would these pans bake, to rise and grow under a yeasty life, but that the bread of something after slicing, the unbuttered country, from whose toaster no piece returns- twists the dough and make us rather beat the fallen batter than rise to others we know not how to bake? Thus cookbooks do make bakers of us all, and thus the native flavor of delight is embittered o’er with the pale cast of egg wash, and rises with great height and motion, with this watch their crusts turn airy and lose the name of dough. Soft ye now! The fair Martha! Felon, in thy shows be all my recipes baked.
Thank you, Shakespeare.
Redone by Sarah Williams.

How to talk to your daughter about her body, step one: don’t talk to your daughter about her body, except to teach her how it works.

Don’t say anything if she’s lost weight. Don’t say anything if she’s gained weight.

If you think your daughter’s body looks amazing, don’t say that. Here are some things you can say instead:

“You look so healthy!” is a great one.

Or how about, “you’re looking so strong.”

“I can see how happy you are – you’re glowing.”

Better yet, compliment her on something that has nothing to do with her body.

Don’t comment on other women’s bodies either. Nope. Not a single comment, not a nice one or a mean one.

Teach her about kindness towards others, but also kindness towards yourself.

Don’t you dare talk about how much you hate your body in front of your daughter, or talk about your new diet. In fact, don’t go on a diet in front of your daughter. Buy healthy food. Cook healthy meals. But don’t say “I’m not eating carbs right now.” Your daughter should never think that carbs are evil, because shame over what you eat only leads to shame about yourself.

Encourage your daughter to run because it makes her feel less stressed. Encourage your daughter to climb mountains because there is nowhere better to explore your spirituality than the peak of the universe. Encourage your daughter to surf, or rock climb, or mountain bike because it scares her and that’s a good thing sometimes.

Help your daughter love soccer or rowing or hockey because sports make her a better leader and a more confident woman. Explain that no matter how old you get, you’ll never stop needing good teamwork. Never make her play a sport she isn’t absolutely in love with.

Prove to your daughter that women don’t need men to move their furniture.

Teach your daughter how to cook kale.

Teach your daughter how to bake chocolate cake made with six sticks of butter.

Pass on your own mom’s recipe for Christmas morning coffee cake. Pass on your love of being outside.

Maybe you and your daughter both have thick thighs or wide ribcages. It’s easy to hate these non-size zero body parts. Don’t. Tell your daughter that with her legs she can run a marathon if she wants to, and her ribcage is nothing but a carrying case for strong lungs. She can scream and she can sing and she can lift up the world, if she wants.

Remind your daughter that the best thing she can do with her body is to use it to mobilize her beautiful soul.

(via jkellemnop)

Amen to this

(via bella-ro-se)

(Source: moxie-bird, via safety-in-recovery)

25 things i wish i realized while i was still in highschool

  1. That zit on your cheek literally does not matter
  2. Skipping class one time will not ruin your entire life
  3. The boy you’re trying so hard to impress will mean nothing to you in a year
  4. Bring coffee to school and ignore people who make fun of it
  5. Bring a snack, too. Don’t care if people hear you eating in class.
  6. Being popular isn’t and will never be something that seriously defines who you are
  7. Appreciate your teachers
  8. Doing/not doing drugs doesn’t make you cooler than anyone else.
  9. Neither does drinking
  10. Talk to the kid sitting alone; even though it may not change your life it could drastically change theirs
  11. Participate in school events
  12. Wear sweatpants everyday
  13. Or wear a dress everyday
  14. Wear whatever makes you comfortable
  15. Nobody will laugh at you if you sit alone at your lunch table for five minutes
  16. Utilize the library
  17. Don’t wait 20 minutes to text someone back just to seem cool
  18. Tell your friends how much you love them
  19. Cherish your free textbooks… seriously
  20. Help confused freshmen, be nice to them. Remember how much you would have appreciated it a couple years ago
  21. Compliment the other girls in the bathroom
  22. That fight you had with your mom really isn’t that big of a deal
  23. It’s okay to cry
  24. Don’t let your desire for a romantic relationship stop you from forming platonic relationships
  25. Remember that life does go on

(via tomlinbooties)

(via elenayogini)

browngirlblues:

her-name-is-wena:

browngirlblues:

I hate it when men make unsolicited comments about a woman’s body. Like “she’s got a nice shape but she needs to tighten up her stomach”

How about you tighten up your lips and never speak again you ignorant shit.

Wow maybe you need to accept constructive criticism jesus christ.

Men telling me (or any other woman) what I need to do for them to find me sexually attractive is not constructive criticism.

(via turtleminimus)

littleitalianrunner:

I love a race where there’s like 100m left and you see the clock and you know you’re gonna PR like that’s just the best feeling

(via runningxctf)